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Archive for the ‘Beef’ Category

Fajitas

One of the best things about roasting a big hunk of meat for two people is how cheaply you can eat for the following couple of days. Leftover roast beef makes for good fajitas. Here is what I used:

Everything you need to make fajitas

Everything you need to make fajitas

To make the fajitas I used half a red and half a green capsicum along with one small onion and around 150-200gms of the leftover beef. I sliced the beef and in a bowl added to it the juice of half a lime and a good shake of fajita seasoning. I covered that and refrigerated it for 30 minutes.

Marinate the beef in lime juice and fajita seasoning

Marinate the beef in lime juice and fajita seasoning

With the avocados, chilis, and the other half of lime I made guacamole. When the beef had about fifteen minutes of marinating to go, I wrapped the tortillas in foil and popped them in the oven at 160 c. I sliced the onion and capsicum thickly, and heated a smidge of olive oil in a large frypan. When the pan began to smoke ever so slightly I carefully added the capsicums and onion and stirfried quickly for about a minute. I then added the beef and kept all the ingredients moving around the pan for another minute or so.

Ready to serve

Ready to serve

I served the beef and peppers with the warmed tortillas, guacamole, sliced pickled jalapenos, sour cream and habanero hot sauce.

The perfect fajita

The perfect fajita

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Gravy

A good roast depends on good gravy. Beef, chicken, lamb, it doesn’t matter. What matters is gravy that you’ve made from scratch, the best kind. And it’s almost as easy as instant.
Gravy depends on fat. Chickens and lamb legs generally have enough for gravy, but when selecting beef be sure to pick a cut with a nice layer of fat. Tonight I cooked a bolar blade roast. This shoulder cut of beef is great for casseroles and slow-cooking, but needs a gentle hand to roast well. After sprinkling the fat with salt and pepper, I cooked my 1.25kg piece for 1 hour and 10 minutes, fat side up. For the first 10 minutes at 190 c, then 180 c for the duration. Here’s how it turned out:

Roast beef Bolar Blade (Shoulder)

Roast beef Bolar Blade (Shoulder)

After removing the roast from the pan to rest, I scraped the pan for bits and poured the fat into a saucepan.

Drippings and bits from the roasting pan

Drippings and bits from the roasting pan

On a low heat I added as much flour as I reckoned there was fat, and stirred until combined for about a minute. I then added a splash of beef stock.

Fat, flour, and a splash of stock

Fat, flour, and a splash of stock

Continuously stirring, I added just over a cup, in small splashes, of stock. The trick to gravy is to keep adding stock until the desired consistency is achieved. I add about a half a teaspoon of Vegemite for colour and a flavour boost.

Just be sure to keep stirring and you’ll have the best gravy you’ve ever tasted.

Roast beef with bok choy, roasted red capsicum and baked sweet potato

Roast beef with bok choy, roasted red capsicum and baked sweet potato

Ingredients

Equal parts pan drippings and flour,  stock, Vegemite

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